New Yorker navigating the labyrinth of telecom with a knack for enterprise networking. Python and Linux aficionado, Apple devotee. Currently leveling up in the realm of DevOps. A Yankees enthusiast in my downtime 🌐🚀

  • 24 Posts
  • 129 Comments
Joined 1 year ago
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Cake day: June 13th, 2023

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  • finn@lemmy.worldtoSysadmin@lemmy.worldA Sysadmin Christmas Poem
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    7 months ago

    An old favorite

    'Twas the night before start-up and all through the net, not a packet was moving; no bit nor octet. The engineers rattled their cards in despair, hoping a bad chip would blow with a flare. The salesmen were nestled all snug in their beds, while visions of data nets danced in their heads. And I with my datascope tracings and dumps prepared for some pretty bad bruises and lumps. When out in the hall there arose such a clatter, I sprang from my desk to see what was the matter.

    There stood at the threshold with PC in tow, An ARPANET hacker, all ready to go. I could see from the creases that covered his brow, he’d conquer the crisis confronting him now. More rapid than eagles, he checked each alarm and scrutinized each for its potential harm.

    On LAPB, on OSI, X.25! TCP, SNA, V.35!

    His eyes were afire with the strength of his gaze; no bug could hide long; not for hours or days. A wink of his eye and a twitch of his head, soon gave me to know I had little to dread. He spoke not a word, but went straight to his work, fixing a net that had gone plumb berserk; And laying a finger on one suspect line, he entered a patch and the net came up fine!

    The packets flowed neatly and protocols matched; the hosts interfaced and shift-registers latched. He tested the system from Gateway to PAD; not one bit was dropped; no checksum was bad. At last he was finished and wearily sighed and turned to explain why the system had died. I twisted my fingers and counted to ten; an off-by-one index had done it again…












  • Your points are well-made, yet they lean heavily on historical precedent while missing recent dynamics. Although past foreign interference is notable, current geopolitics require fresh evidence to assert foreign involvement. Africa is indeed a growing geopolitical theatre, but the narrative isn’t solely about external actors - the agency of African states and citizens plays a crucial role. Dismissing them risks oversimplifying the complex reality.



  • It’s crucial to remember that Niger is a key western ally in the fight against Islamist militancy in West Africa. Therefore, direct involvement from countries such as the KSA, China, or Russia seems less likely, as it would conflict with their international relations and objectives.

    While it’s conceivable that non-state actors could have a hand in the unrest, available information doesn’t provide concrete evidence for this claim. It’s also worth noting that jihadist groups in the region are not homogenous, and often have differing interests, making their involvement in political coups complicated and less probable.

    However, you rightly point out that these situations are rarely as simple as they appear. The truth may well be a mix of local grievances and foreign influences, given the complex and interconnected nature of global politics. Until there’s more information, though, any assertions remain largely speculative.


  • In the geopolitical context of West Africa, this attempted coup highlights the recurrent destabilizing elements that persist in the region. The instability, primarily fueled by jihadist insurgencies, external powers, and internal grievances, significantly hinders democratic progress and socio-economic development. Niger, like its neighbors, Mali and Burkina Faso, finds itself in a precarious situation, walking a fine line between international alliances, internal political dynamics, and threats from non-state actors. This event calls for an in-depth academic exploration into the cyclical nature of power struggles in post-colonial states, specifically examining how external interventions, both past and present, intersect with domestic power dynamics.



  • finn@lemmy.worldOPtoMildly Infuriating@lemmy.worldThis
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    1 year ago

    I get it - complaints about complaints, the ‘Inception’ of discourse, right? 😄 My aim was less ‘moan-fest’, more ‘awareness-raising’. But I see how it could have come off as one more tiresome rant. Point taken.

    Downvoting? Sure, it’s a tool, but it feels like trying to empty an ocean with a bucket. As a community, can’t we aim higher? Maybe introduce more efficient levers? Let’s not just ‘downvote and move on’, let’s ‘upvote and move up’. Let’s brainstorm and pull this platform to greater heights.